Mechanical ventilation book

 

    “The book is written for clinicians such as physicians, respiratory technicians, and nurses. This book presents basic principles of mechanical ventilation. Understanding Mechanical Ventilation: A Practical Handbook: Medicine & Health Science Books @ softliromaspi.ml Principles And Practice of Mechanical Ventilation, Third and millions of other books are available for site Kindle. Martin J. Tobin, MD is Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Loyola University Health Systems in Chicago, Illinois.

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    Mechanical Ventilation Book

    When one of the authors of this book began his ICU career, he sought a short ' primer' on mechanical ventilation. None existed. Worse, this remains true some Principles and Practice of Mechanical Ventilation, 3e. Martin J. Tobin. Search Textbook Autosuggest Results. Show Chapters Hide Chapters. I. Historical. Share. Email; Facebook; Twitter; Linked In; Reddit; CiteULike. View Table of Contents for A Practical Guide to Mechanical Ventilation.

    Mechanical Ventilation: Physiological and Clinical Applications,. ISBN X. Report Mechanical Ventilation provides a comprehensive theoretical background and practical approach to mechanical ventilation. It is written primarily for respiratory therapists, but critical care and respiratory physicians and nurses will find many aspects of the book invaluable, particularly the clear and concise descriptions of the different modes of mechanical ventilation, their advantages and disadvantages, and a practical approach to common problems encountered during mechanical ventilation. The book is divided into five sections. The first encompasses basic aspects of mechanical ventilation, including the history of resuscitation and mechanical ventilation, arterial blood gas interpretation, basic terminology and concepts of mechanical ventilation, ventilator graphic displays, and the physical aspects of mechanical ventilators. I found this latter section particularly useful as it provides an explanation of the 'nuts and bolts' of mechanical ventilation in a lucid and easily understandable manner. As the authors themselves bemuse, sometimes there is a bewildering display of graphic information on newer microprocessor-controlled ventilators that can be overwhelming to the uninitiated. This section demystifies this aspect of mechanical ventilators by explaining key concepts in a readily understandable manner. In addition, the section on the history of mechanical ventilation was informative and entertaining, and it helps one appreciate how rapidly this field has progressed in the past 50 years.

    It is written primarily for respiratory therapists, but critical care and respiratory physicians and nurses will find many aspects of the book invaluable, particularly the clear and concise descriptions of the different modes of mechanical ventilation, their advantages and disadvantages, and a practical approach to common problems encountered during mechanical ventilation. The book is divided into five sections.

    The first encompasses basic aspects of mechanical ventilation, including the history of resuscitation and mechanical ventilation, arterial blood gas interpretation, basic terminology and concepts of mechanical ventilation, ventilator graphic displays, and the physical aspects of mechanical ventilators.

    I found this latter section particularly useful as it provides an explanation of the 'nuts and bolts' of mechanical ventilation in a lucid and easily understandable manner. As the authors themselves bemuse, sometimes there is a bewildering display of graphic information on newer microprocessor-controlled ventilators that can be overwhelming to the uninitiated.

    This section demystifies this aspect of mechanical ventilators by explaining key concepts in a readily understandable manner.

    In addition, the section on the history of mechanical ventilation was informative and entertaining, and it helps one appreciate how rapidly this field has progressed in the past 50 years. The second section of the book pertains to monitoring in mechanical ventilation, and discusses additional aspects of arterial blood gas analysis, calametry, and respiratory system mechanics.

    Understanding Mechanical Ventilation

    Hemodynamic monitoring of the ventilated patient is discussed, with particular emphasis on the effects of mechanical ventilation on these parameters.

    While the section provides a good basic discussion of key issues, the reader is referred to textbooks of critical care medicine for a more in-depth discussion of this area.

    The third section covers the physiological and pathological pulmonary and nonpulmonary effects of mechanical ventilation, including cardiovascular, renal, and central nervous system effects. The section on pulmonary effects of mechanical ventilation includes a clear discussion of barotrauma and volutrauma, of ventilator-associated pneumonia, of oxygen toxicity, and of complications of the artificial airway.

    There have been many developments in this area in the past 5 years, making this section slightly out of date.

    A Practical Guide to Mechanical Ventilation | Wiley Online Books

    The next edition of the book will no doubt be updated and expanded in this important area. The fourth section discusses physiological aspects of acute respiratory failure and the criteria for establishment of mechanical ventilation, a practical approach to initiation of mechanical ventilation, practical aspects of ventilator set-up including sensitivity, fraction of inspired oxygen, humidification, and alarms , assessment of the initial settings of mechanical ventilation and practical suggestions for adjusting these, use of positive end-expiratory pressure and CPAP, changing ventilator circuits, patient positioning, sedation and paralysis, and finally weaning and discontinuation of mechanical ventilation, including extubation.

    The final section of the book discusses newer modes of mechanical ventilation, including high-frequency ventilation, ventilation of the pediatric patient, home ventilation, liquid ventilation, extracorporeal gas exchange, tracheal gas insufflation, and the use of nitric oxide and HeliOx.

    I found this to be a good introduction to a complex and evolving area but, again, slightly out of date given the rapid evolution of the field of high-frequency ventilation and liquid ventilation. The list of authors is an impressive collection of experts from around the world who conduct research and are active in societies in addition to their clinical duties.

    Every chapter is thoroughly researched and up-to-date. The expert minds give the reader a window into their thinking. Many authors mention ongoing or recently completed research and clinical trials, and the new evidence will undoubtedly be presented in the next edition.

    Pilbeam's Mechanical Ventilation

    Overall, the book is well organized and easy to read. The chapters can be read separately if you are exploring a topic or the book can be read continuously for comprehension of all the topics. The chapters contain references to other chapters where needed, so repetition is limited.

    In a clinical sense, the authors of the chapter want to convey the importance of pathophysiologic concepts, applying knowledge and experience, and then making clinical decisions based on the all of the previous. This premise is followed throughout that book. Background and data are presented first, and reader is guided into the decision-making process.

    For anesthesiologist, the book provides a perioperative bridge to the world of mechanical ventilation usually found in critical care settings. With this text, an anesthesiologist can become familiar with methods available on anesthesia ventilators.

    Other methods of ventilation may be worth reading about because many of the technologies found in the intensive care unit ventilator have crossed over to the current anesthesia ventilator. The book with the basic principles and practical everyday management issues of ventilators and patients is a must have in all libraries. New chapters, with topics ranging from the complex, such as the neurally adjusted ventilator assist mode and extracorporeal life support for cardiopulmonary failure, to the simplest, such as airway secretions and suctioning, show how comprehensive the book continues to be.

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